MCAS Miramar-EMS HomeDivisionsExecutive BranchNon-Environmental, Other Monitored ProgramsEnergy Management
SiteData
Environmental Management (S-7)

 

Environmental Management (S-7)

"MORE THAN OUR CODE . . . IT'S OUR CORPS"

The Environmental Management System of MCAS Miramar
ENERGY MANAGEMENT
Program Manager

858-577-6150



Significant cost avoidance and reduction of valuable resources can be achieved through an effective energy management program. Environmental benefits, such as a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants associated with the production of electricity or the burning of fuels, will be attained through a comprehensive energy program. This program requires an all -hands effort and an on-going commitment to sound energy management practices, life -cycle cost-effective energy efficiency projects, and efficient day-to-day operations of MCAS Miramar resources and facilities. The program does not sacrifice quality of life or productivity for energy efficiency. An effective energy management program will improve quality of life and productivity by tailoring energy use to actual needs and by freeing up dollars otherwise spent on energy for more urgent mission and personnel support requirements.  The energy management program also has objectives to increase energy security aboard the installation to further the Marine Corps resilience towards external threats.

PROGRAMS, PLANS, RESOURCES AND RESPONSIBILITES

The S-4 Installation and Logistics Director has overall coordinating responsibility for energy resources management and shall appoint the Base Energy Manager under the Public Works Division. The Base Energy Manager will establish an Energy Management Team that will provide oversight and coordination of the energy management program and utilities studies, audits, and projects.

The Energy Management Team shall have the following membership:

  1. S-4 Installation and Logistics Director.
  2. Deputy S-4 Installation and Logistics Director.
  3. Public Works Officer (PWO).
  4. Engineering Division Supervisor.
  5. Facilities Maintenance Director.
  6. Energy Manager I Energy Management Consultant .
  7. Financial Management Supervisor.
  8. Planning Director .
  9. Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) .
  10. Marine Corps Community Services (MCCS) Director.

The Energy Management Team is responsible for the following:

  1. Ensure team members are aware of the mandated energy goals and the specific energy issues facing our fliacilities. Encourage team members to use their knowledge of building operations and mission requirements to suggest ways to reduce energy costs.
  2. Provide briefings to the Commanding Officer (CO), department heads, and tenant activities . Keep the command apprised
    of energy issues and progress toward energy and cost reduction goals. Make energy management an integral part of daily operations.
  3. Ensure resources and energy systems are properly maintained, repaired, and monitored. Set up a system for energy-related problems to be promptly reported and resolved. Encourage maintenance personnel to use their expert knowledge of building systems to submit suggestions for reducing energy costs.

    Responsibilities of installation energy programs include:
  • Utilize AMI and associated data management systems to:

    Perform energy audits to evaluate current energy usage and determine the best locations to incorporate energy savings measures such as ESPCs and UESCs.

  • Ensure that COOP plans address energy emergency preparedness, protection and restoration of mission critical and essential functions.

  • Coordinate with tenant units to conduct annual energy security vulnerability analyses and develop action plans to remove unacceptable energy security risks.

  • Collaborate on renewable generation projects that could benefit from an increased presence of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). BEVs can be used to increase load for renewable power generation and can provide a ready source of battery storage for micro-grid stability.

  • Offer cost-effective alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and coordinate with facility managers and local/regional fleet managers to ensure that any vehicle  acquisitions have sufficient infrastructure to support the intended design and fuel source.

  • Evaluate cost-effective military construction and major building renovation projects involving roof replacements that incorporate roof-top solar thermal, photo-voltaic, and/or energy-reducing coating technologies.

  • Evaluate potential renewable energy sources, to provide reliable power supplies and fuel diversification.

  • Adopt efficient and alternative fuel vehicle technologies and commercially available vehicle telematics that assist NTV users and managers in reducing unnecessary petroleum use wherever cost-effective.

  • Optimize the use of NTVs and ensure compliance with efficiency-related policies.

  • Implement demand reduction and peak shaving strategies to reduce overall installation energy costs.

  • Ensure that all building new construction and major renovations meet LEED Silver criteria, achieving a minimum of 40 percent of LEED credits from the Energy and Atmosphere (EA) and Water Efficiency (WE) sections.

  • Perform life-cycle cost analyses to justify decisions related to capital investments involving energy-related infrastructure.

  • Perform energy audits to evaluate current energy usage and determine the best locations to incorporate energy savings measures such as ESPCs and UESCs. 

  • Adopt efficient and alternative fuel vehicle technologies and commercially available vehicle telematics that assist NTV users and managers in reducing unnecessary petroleum use wherever cost-effective.

  • Optimize the use of NTVs and ensure compliance with efficiency-related policies.

  • Implement demand reduction and peak shaving strategies to reduce overall installation energy costs.

  • Ensure that all building new construction and major renovations meet LEED Silver criteria, achieving a minimum of 40 percent of LEED credits from the Energy and Atmosphere (EA) and Water Efficiency (WE) sections.
  • Perform life cycle cost analyses to justify decisions related to capital investments involving energy-related infrastructure

Energy Manager Responsibilities include:

  1. Inform Unit Energy Managers (UEMs) and end-users about energy consumption at tenant and supported commands.
  2. Identify operational efficiency improvements by benchmarking building energy use and measuring energy project performance.
  3. Reduce energy costs through demand reduction and peak shaving strategies.
  4. Ensure cybersecurity and accreditation of utility and building control systems.
  5. Integrate energy information into centrally managed data systems that support near real-time command and control of energy management and building control systems.
  6. Integrate improved fuel management systems using telematics to better track NTV fuel usage.
TRAINING AND COMMUNICATION
  • The Energy Manager shall train key personnel, including Unit Energy Managers, in the most effective ways to manage energy at their facilities from design to operations The Energy Manager shall also provide personnel with key ideas to check building systems and new programs and technologies.
  • The Energy Program will use all available assets to promote energy awareness aboard the station to include publicizing in the station newspapers, family housing newsletters, MCCS, Station wide e-mails, and other media.
  • The Energy Manager shall develop, in coordination with other activities, special training and energy awareness activities for specific events such as Energy Awareness Month .

 

PRACTICE-ASPECT-IMPACT-RISK

Practice

  1. Operating the Installation

Aspect

  1. Energy Usage - All buildings and facilities aboard MCAS Miramar use energy. It is in the interest of the Marine Corps to reduce energy usage when possible by utilizing more energy efficient systems, switching off lights and unplugging appliances when not in use, and generating sustainable energy via the establishment of photovoltaic arrays.
  2. Water Consumption - Most buildings and facilities aboard MCAS Miramar are connected to the City of San Diego's water system. In the interests of good environmental stewardship, fiscal responsibility, and assisting California in coping with future droughts, the Station is committed to conserving water. 

Impact & Risk

  1. Energy usage and water consumption are utilities and necessary to the operation of the Station and its ability to fulfill the mission. MCAS Miramar is constantly identifying areas in which energy and water use can be decreased in order to meet EO 13693 benchmarks. In addition, MCAS Miramar has the interest of reducing energy and water consumption to lower operating costs.
OBJECTIVES-TARGETS-ACTIONS TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

The governing document outlining Marine Corps Energy Objectives and Targets can be viewed here:

Energy Managment/USMC Installations Energy Strategy (June 2013)

 

Marine Corps Energy Objectives 

  1. Energy Information
    1. Establish common requirements for the functions and capabilities of all installation-level energy information systems.
    2. Establish an enterprise energy management system.
    3. Equip non-tactical vehicle (NTV) fleets with upgraded fuel management systems.
  2. Energy Efficiency
    1. Improve efficiencies of energy-related infrastructure.
    2. Utilize alternative financing mechanisms to implement energy efficiency measures.
    3. Reduce petroleum consumption in non-tactical vehicle (NTV) operations.
  3. Renewable Energy and Alternative Fuel
    1. Leverage power purchase and leasing agreements to implement large-scale renewable energy projects over 1 MW.
    2. Continue to add capacity through small-scale renewable generation.
    3. Increase the utilization of alternative fuels for nontactical vehicles (NTVs).
  4. Energy Security
    1. Assess and prioritize mission energy requirements.
    2. Identify points of utility and delivery systems vulnerability.
    3. Mitigate unacceptable energy security risks.
AUDIT AND EVALUATION OF COMPLIANCE